Talking Book and Health, Agriculture, and Literacy

Purpose

Here is a complete health/agriculture/literacy summary of the project, followed by field-specific versions.


Long Version

Literacy Bridge's Talking Book Project is enabling local people and organizations to create, distribute, and access audio knowledge libraries in the most remote and underserved regions of the world.

Farmers in a remote district of northern Ghana now have on-demand access to a wealth of relevant agriculture knowledge. In villages that are miles from grid electricity, illiterate farmers are using a simple, durable, and portable audio device to browse and listen to recorded information from agriculture extension agents.

Nurses in busy rural clinics are using the same audio device to educate patients waiting for health services. These devices contain locally produced recordings about nutrition and disease prevention. Patients can also copy hours of these health messages to their village device to bring back to their family and friends for later reference.

Children of illiterate parents who share a classroom with 70-100 other students are able to use the devices to practice reading exercises with feedback from multiple choice tests. Students are able to playback at various speeds, to suit their learning level.

Agriculture, health, and education are three areas being improved by local people and organizations through the use of Literacy Bridge’s Talking Book Device. The device is a $10 rugged audio computer that uses locally available batteries, is accessible to the visually impaired, allows each message to be copied from one device to another, and supports interactive educational lessons and games.


Agriculture Version

Literacy Bridge's Talking Book Project is enabling local people and organizations to create, distribute, and access audio knowledge libraries in the most remote and underserved regions of the world.

Farmers in a remote district of northern Ghana now have on-demand access to a wealth of relevant agriculture knowledge. In villages that are miles from grid electricity, illiterate farmers are using a simple, durable, and portable audio device to browse and listen to recorded information from agriculture extension agents.

The device is a $10 rugged audio computer that uses locally available batteries, is accessible to the visually impaired, allows each message to be copied from one device to another, and supports interactive educational lessons and games.

Local organizations in the current pilot program are also applying the Talking Book Device to improve literacy and health education.


Health Version

Literacy Bridge's Talking Book Project is enabling local people and organizations to create, distribute, and access audio knowledge libraries in the most remote and underserved regions of the world.

Nurses in busy rural clinics are using a simple, durable, and portable audio device to educate patients waiting for health services through locally produced recordings about nutrition and disease prevention. Clients can also copy hours of these health messages onto their village device to bring back to their family and friends for later reference.

The device is a $10 rugged audio computer that uses locally available batteries, is accessible to the visually impaired, allows each message to be copied from one device to another, and supports interactive educational lessons and games.

Local organizations in the current pilot program are also applying the Talking Book Device to improve literacy and agriculture education.


Literacy Version

Literacy Bridge's Talking Book Project is enabling local people and organizations to improve literacy skills and create, distribute, and access audio knowledge libraries in the most remote and underserved regions of the world.

Children of illiterate parents who share a classroom with 70-100 other students are able to use the devices to practice reading exercises with feedback from multiple choice tests. Students are able to playback at various speeds, to suit their learning level. {NEED MORE HERE}

The device is a $10 rugged audio computer that uses locally available batteries, is accessible to the visually impaired, allows each message to be copied from one device to another, and supports interactive educational lessons and games.

Local organizations in the current pilot program are also applying the Talking Book Device to improve agriculture and health education.